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Geology

When Darwin introduced his theory of evolution in 1859 with his celebrated publication, “On the Origin of Species,” he knew that a geological record of fossils would be essential to tell his story. His basic proposal of natural selection won him much acclaim. He predicted that organisms with better traits would adapt to their environment and succeed over many generations, changing slowly over long periods of time

When Darwin introduced his theory of evolution in 1859 with his celebrated publication, “On the Origin of Species,” he knew that a geological record of fossils would be essential to tell his story. His basic proposal of natural selection won him much acclaim. He predicted that organisms with better traits would adapt to their environment and succeed over many generations, changing slowly over long periods of time

The Mayan’s were wrong, but in the end, global warming will still get us all! That is right. Evidently, after forecasting a calendar that far outlived the civilization that created it, the world has once again survived the latest Chicken Little catastrophe to befall mankind. My guess is that the Mayans simply ran out of ink.

Most geologists believe that all the continents presently situated around the world were once linked forming one super-continent called Pangaea. From the evolutionary perspective those who study Plate Tectonics theorize that this super-continent broke up at the end of the Mesozoic era that evolutionary theory say began 250 million years ago.