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While there are very few indications that man and certain extinct dinosaurs coexisted. There are many so-called living fossils that are evidently largely unchanged over the eons of time postulated by Darwinian Theory) most of the evidence in the fossil record points to special creation. It is the nature of fossil formation that evidence for man and dinosaurs being co-mingled in the geologic column would be rare indeed, if not completely absent.

When using the evolutionary time frame we usually separate living organisms into the two categories that you mentioned, e.g. modern or prehistoric. As those who have acknowledged the biblical Flood as the major factor in the creation of the geologic column as well as the fossil record, we would not by apt to buy into the classic evolutionary argument concerning change over time.

Ardipithecus ramidus, or as we have come to know her Ardi, is supposed to represent the oldest fossilized specimen or the earliest of the so-called missing links in ape-to-man evolution. She is said to predate the discovery of other hominids, e.g. the australopithecines. These precursors to man, e.g. Lucy and her australopithecine relatives refer to the discoveries of the renowned Kenyan archeologists Louis and Mary Leakey.

Have you ever wondered why so many extinct species of plants and animals look almost exactly like their modern-day counterparts? The textbooks are filled with examples of “living fossils.” What we find is nearly, if not completely, identical organisms remaining virtually unchanged. These fossils are supposed to be really, really, really old, but they look nearly identical to the ones that live today.